The combined company creates the most comprehensive suite of technologies to accelerate generative AI for 3D spatial video

Evercoast, a leading provider of end-to-end 3D spatial video software, has  announced the acquisition of Depthkit, a pioneer in volumetric capture. This strategic acquisition marks a significant leap forward in the race to capture and generate 3D digital humans and spatial video, a field of immersive video content that allows viewers to see subjects and dynamic scenes from all angles on any digital device. Today’s news also marks a key milestone for the evolution of generative AI from 2D to 3D creation, as the extensive datasets collected by both companies can fill a much-needed gap in required training data.

Comprehensive 3D datasets haven’t existed due to the inherent complexity and expense of creating them, and consequently the algorithms have lagged behind. AI platforms from OpenAI, Meta, Google, Microsoft, Anthropic, and a growing list of others have been built on massive sources of text and 2D datasets, not 3D spatial data. Evercoast and Depthkit fill this void by bringing together the largest customer base for 3D volumetric video in the world. Combined, the companies are uniquely able to deliver a highly scalable software platform capable of capturing and generating thousands of assets in a single day. This capability is several orders of magnitude faster and 20x less expensive than multi-camera arrays using traditional processing pipelines and expensive hardware. 

“Teaming up with Evercoast represents a thrilling new chapter for Depthkit and the entire 3D content creation community,” said James George, CEO of Scatter, the company that developed Depthkit. “By joining forces, we are not just merging two leading technologies but also uniting our visions to create tools that are both innovative and accessible. We are confident our combined efforts will push the boundaries of spatial video and create new opportunities around the globe.” 

Spatial video datasets and models tackle unique characteristics that 2D video struggles to effectively emulate at scale: 

● Real-world Variability: Human motion is highly variable and influenced by numerous factors such as lighting conditions, occlusions, and diverse environments. Real-world datasets with multiple camera views provide a more comprehensive and accurate representation of these variations.

● Depth and 3D Understanding: Multi-camera setups enable the capture of more accurate depth information, which is essential for understanding the spatial relationships between body parts and clothing. 

● Cross-view Generalization: Training models using data from multiple camera views helps them generalize more effectively than monocular or synthetic datasets, particularly in scenarios with complex interactions where human performance involves other objects or individuals. 

The growing base of specialized AI development in human performance capture, medical training, industrial simulation, robotics, sports performance, and higher education represents a massive addressable market for this technology. VFX and other creative technologists also are using volumetric data combined with machine learning and AI video. These verticals tightly overlap between the two companies, and the combined technology stack further expands the market by delivering a hardware agnostic offering. 

Moving forward, existing Depthkit customers will have full access to their existing features as well as a host of additional functionality through Evercoast. To learn more about Evercoast’s solutions for spatial video production, visit evercoast.com

Allan Torp Jensen
Author: Allan Torp Jensen

Allan has worked on visual effects for feature films and television for 20 years. He has experience of the full VFX pipeline but has focused on compositing for the past 15 years and has been a Lead Compositor and Compositing Supervisor on various shows. He has worked with the talented people at Cinesite, Bluebolt VFX, Automatik VFX in London, and Weta Digital in New Zealand. For the past five years, he has worked remotely at his own Torper Studio on various high-end TV and feature film projects.

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